Monday, February 2, 2015

8 Ways to Better Market Yourself on LinkedIn

Brian Honigman

LinkedIn has always been the industry standard when it comes to marketing yourself professionally, but the past few years have seen the social network’s importance and reach increase 
dramatically. TechCrunch reports that LinkedIn has roughly 187 million unique visitors per month, and that number looks like it’ll continue to grow.

In addition, LinkedIn has ramped up its efforts to become a content platform. In the past three years LinkedIn has acquired SlidesharePulse and Newsle; all of which hint at a continuing push towards content distribution.

Instead of just maintaining your profile and company page and being active in LinkedIn groups, LinkedIn is now encouraging brands and individuals to leverage its robust, new publishing capabilities. It is clear that LinkedIn sees itself as a vital part of the future of content marketing.

Building out your LinkedIn presence can seem intimidating. There are so many options now that the thought of exploiting them all can overwhelm even the savviest marketers.

Keeping this problem in mind, I set out to track down the most influential and accomplished LinkedIn experts and ask them to weigh in on their recommendations for making the most of your LinkedIn Marketing.

Viveka von Rosen: Leverage LinkedIn’s CRM

Viveka von Rosen is a prominent LinkedIn expert and author of the book LinkedIn Marketing: An Hour a Day. Her recommendation not only highlights some interesting, often overlooked LinkedIn features, but also shows how they can be used to strengthen your networking connections.

Viveka notes that “LinkedIn is about building relationships, and one of the best ways of building relationships is to show your top prospects that you were listening to them.” With this in mind, she points out that LinkedIn actually provides users with fairly robust CRM tools.

She recommends leveraging these tools in five steps:
1. Research your prospect or client (or better yet, have a conversation with them – maybe at a conference or trade show?)
2. Make your notes about the person on their LinkedIn profile. (Click on the star icon to “unfold” LinkedIn’s CRM feature.)
3. Set a reminder to follow up with your prospect.
4. Find an article of your own or search Pulse to find content you think they might be interested in.
5. You can also tag your prospects, segmenting your network in a way that makes sense to you, and that will allow you to follow up with them in smaller groups.


Stephanie Sammons: The “10 in 10″ Rule

Stephanie Sammons is a renowned LinkedIn expert, named a Top 30 Marketing Thought Leader and a Top 25 Social Media Expert by LinkedIn, who coaches professionals on how to maximize their social presence. Her recommendation for marketers and business owners who hope to build their presence is to adopt what she refers to as the “10 in 10” rule.
“While others are pumping out content and status updates to their entire network” Stephanie instead encourages professionals to “go one-to-one with 10 of your connections 10 minutes a day.”

If you spend 10 minutes a day engaging personally with 10 of your valued LinkedIn contacts, you will grow your influence.

The first step in her process is to identify your MVC’s (Most Valuable Connections) LinkedIn. “These may be prospects, clients, influencers, or advocates for your business. Next, study their profiles and learn more about who they are, what they do, and who they help.”

She continues by noting that “once you are armed with greater intelligence about your MVC’s, strive for a one-to-one engagement with at least 10 of these individuals per day. One-to-one engagement can be in the form of a personalized, private LinkedIn message, a public comment or conversation, a or even an @mention.”

The reasoning goes that a personal, intimate connection with a smaller number of followers can be much more beneficial than an attempt to please everyone. This appears straightforward, but it seems that so few actually spend the emotional energy necessary to foster these connections.

Stephanie offers the assurance that although this consistent connection is hard to maintain, it will be well worth it in the long-run and ultimately lead to social media success.

See all 8 ways and the complete Entrepreneur article

Friday, January 30, 2015

3 Ways to Use LinkedIn to Build Your Career

Heather R. Huhman

In a world where social media allows us to connect with almost everyone in the free world instantaneously, one platform dominates the professional networking space. Its name? LinkedIn.

By now, most people in the professional world have heard of LinkedIn. Job seekers know it can help them find a career, but many don’t know how to maximize their use of the platform. This hurts their chances of standing out to the almost 50 percent of companies that solely use it in their social recruiting practices.

When employers look for potential candidates on LinkedIn, there are a multitude of ways they narrow down the pool. Check out these three tips to help you get the most out of your LinkedIn profile, increase your chances of getting noticed by recruiters, and become a better proactive job seeker. 

Apply for jobs

LinkedIn not only connects people in order to build their network, but also it allows you to find and apply for jobs directly through the site! Just like any other job board, you can search for the exact job you want and discover employers from around the world. The benefit for job searching through LinkedIn: it allows employers and job seekers near-instant access to connect and gather information about each other, and gives candidates more insight into the company and its employees.

If you make a list of companies you want to work for (which you should, if you haven’t), LinkedIn lets you follow the company pages of those that have one. On those pages, companies often exclusively post jobs, since they know it will reach people who have already vested interest in their organization by following them in the first place. This gives you access to positions you never would have known existed and also lets you engage/connect with employees in those organizations.

When you apply for a job on LinkedIn, it’s important to read the entire job posting. Doing so lets you get a feel for what exactly they’re seeking so you can tailor your application specifically to the posting.

Since the LinkedIn application system only lets you attach a resume when applying, many companies give specific instructions for how they want candidates to apply in order to get more information. By not doing so, you’re probably not going to get considered for the job, since they now know you just blindly applied without following the application instructions.

Also, don’t just apply to every job posting because it’s so easy — chances are, it won’t get noticed.


Wednesday, January 28, 2015

10 LinkedIn mistakes that will cost you a job

By J. Barbush

Remember when networking was something you did with your dad or mom and their circle? Your parents would mention to their friends, "Did you know my daughter is interested in advertising?"

Nowadays you don't need a parental circle, or even your parents, to connect to people who can help with your career.

You do need a plan. Now that you can contact people so easily on LinkedIn, how will you use that access?

LinkedIn adds texture to a boring résumé. It brings your interests, charities, and portfolio to life in one place.

But it's also easy to overindulge—like a college freshman at his or her first kegger—and embarrass yourself. Making a silly mistake on Facebook is one thing. Embarrassing yourself on LinkedIn could cost you a job or career.

Here are some common mistakes to avoid on LinkedIn:

Mistake No. 1: You don't consider yourself a product.
Deconstruct what you like about your favorite brands. Are they funny, clever, consistent? Do they always deliver on their identities? Do they innovate? Do they have a competitive advantage? Keeping those considerations in mind will help you build a simple, tailored, smart profile.


Once you determine your personal product voice, incorporate it into your profile. Lead with a concise, well-written summary that details your capabilities and what you can contribute.

Mistake No. 3: You're too social.
Stop thinking of LinkedIn as a social network. It's a professional network. There's a big difference in how you approach a social dinner versus a business dinner, right?

Use this analogy. Rather than focus on connecting with buddies, zero in on connecting with people you just met at a conference. You may not be as "social" with them as with your college buddies, but you do have a common business interest that will serve you much better on this platform.

Your headshot should also be professional. A suggestive shot or one that shows you partying won't go over well in human resources. 

See all 10 mistakes and the complete article

Tuesday, January 27, 2015

5 LinkedIn Mistakes That Are Hurting Your Job Search

Don Goodman

Job searching on LinkedIn offers the job seeker multiple benefits. Most importantly, internal and external recruiters use it to source talent. It is also helps you network – connecting with contacts who may help with identifying job opportunities, referrals, and offer advice and information.


Take care to manage your Linkedin profile properly. Mistakes can hurt your job search and your professional image. Consider these tips on what you shouldn’t do on LinkedIn.

1. Don’t leave your sub-headline to read your job title.

By default, your current job title is the default sub-headline (the text that appears under your name) for your profile. It typically reads something like Accountant at 123 Company. That doesn’t tell the employer much upfront. The sub-headline is one of several important areas that drive keyword density, so entice potential employers and recruiters to click on your profile by putting in a personal branding statement like Tax Compliance Specialist & Strategic Business Consultant for Fortune 500 Companies.

4. Don’t accept every connection that comes your way.

The bigger the network, the better it looks, right? Not exactly when you’re a job seeker. Yes, it’s good to have a big network of connections, but it also has to be appropriate connections. You want to show potential employers and recruiters that you have connections in the field and industry. For instance, if you are vying for a job in health care business development but your profile shows 90% of your connections are made up of contacts in random fields and industries, it’s not exactly informing employers and recruiters that you’re well-connected for the job.


See all 5 Mistakes and the complete Careerealism article

Monday, January 26, 2015

10 Ways to Commit to LinkedIn

Friday, January 23, 2015

5 People You Should Ask For LinkedIn Recommendations

Jessica Holbrook Hernandez

LinkedIn recommendations are a tremendous asset to your job search. You can quickly and easily point a potential employer to your LinkedIn profile and they’ll be able to see verifiable references and recommendations of the quality of your work and the results you deliver. Positive words can be powerful motivators.


So, how do you choose the right people to request a recommendation from? And how do you know if they’ll give you a good recommendation?


2. The Team Player

When you work in a team on a specific project and the collaboration is a success, that’s the time to ask your teammates to write a recommendation for you based on the outcome and collaboration of that specific project. You can also return the favor; since you worked together you’ll be able to easily attest to their work ethic, problem solving, communication, teamwork, fresh ideas, motivation—the list goes on…


5. The Board Or Volunteer Head

Are you an active member of a nonprofit or involved in volunteering for a great cause? Ask someone who oversees the organization to recommend you for the work you’ve been doing. Not only is this more positive PR for your profile, but it shows your interests and desire to help others.


Have some additional ideas for great LinkedIn recommendation requests? Share them here; I’d love to hear them! And while LinkedIn is on your mind I’d love to connect so feel free to send me an invitation here.


See all 5 people and the complete Careerealism article

Thursday, January 22, 2015

6 tips on How to Be a Successful LinkedIn Groupie

Jeff Lipschultz

Having a LinkedIn profile is a good start to connecting with recruiters and hiring managers, but you must do more than just create an account and list a few jobs in your profile.

A few of my previous articles highlight some of the key tasks to getting noticed on LinkedIn: How to Be LinkedIn to Recruiters and How to Add Recruiters to Your LinkedIn Network. Included in these articles are mentions on being part of Groups. Beyond what is suggested in those articles, I’d like to share some more ideas on Group participation.

No Spam


Although this should be obvious, Group leaders are looking for relevant posts to attract and keep Group members. They will block you if you continually just submit generic links, mundane information that has little to do with the intent of the Group, and worse yet, promotions of your services (there is a separate section for this called Promotions).

Connectivity

Groups allow for recruiters to connect with you with some common bond - instead of just sending you a generic InMail message. When recruiters leverage LinkedIn to find candidates, they use key words (which should be in your profile) to find the right candidates.

When you show up in a Group, you two already have something in common (the Group), and you have moved towards the top of the list for getting reviewed and possibly contacted. Simply put, you’re easier to interact with - even more than a third-level connection.


Feel free to connect with any recruiter in a Group that looks to be working within your field. They have selected this Group for a reason - they too, want to be found. If they are in a Java Programming Group, generally, it is not because they want to learn more about coding in Java. They want to network with Java experts.

See all 6 tips and the complete article