10 Ways to Make Your LinkedIn Profile Stand Out as a Job Seeker

by Social-Hire.com

You’ve finally decided to start a profile on LinkedIn (after reading all about the benefits of using LinkedIn to find a job here, no doubt!) and patiently sit back waiting for a recruiter to come calling. But after weeks of not getting a bite, you wonder if there is anything you can do to improve the performance of your LinkedIn profile? Why, yes…there is!  A LinkedIn profile can easily be worked with so that you stand out from your peers in a positive way.

Let’s look at a few ways to capture the attention of the best hiring companies with 10 expert tips for creating an outstanding LinkedIn profile.

#2 – Strong summary standout

Just as you will on your resume, the LinkedIn profile gives you a great space to create a strong summary of skills and achievements. Use this well by drafting up a 3 sentence summary that tells others who you are about. Add a bulleted list of your top 5 attributes just below this. Hint: write it in a word processing product and paste it in.

#3 – Make it job search friendly

There are a growing number of companies that utilize LinkedIn recruitment tools. Make sure your LinkedIn profile is friendly to this system by lining up your last 3 jobs in the right format. Highlight your skills and use a professional catch line next to your image to make your applications “pop”.

#7 – Use the right keywords

Recruiters use specific simply keyword phrases when seeking out the best candidates. Keep this in mind as you develop your LinkedIn profile. Avoid being too wordy or using obtuse phrases. Think about how recruiters will search for you. If you are a writer, you are not a “wordsmith”, for example.

See all 10 and the complete article

The Mistake 99 Percent of LinkedIn Users Make and How to Fix It

By J.T. O’Donnell

Last week, LinkedIn celebrated its 13th birthday. It’s officially a teenager. With more than 414 million users, it’s the largest professional social network. And it’s getting bigger by the day, making it the biggest pool of talent online as well. When it comes to LinkedIn, we’re all little fishes in a big pond. Which means, if you want to be contacted about great business and career opportunities through LinkedIn, you need to stand out. However, that’s where many users are making a critical mistake.

99 percent of users fail to optimize their profile.

Most of LinkedIn’s members don’t know how to optimize the content of their profile so they can be found. It all comes down to putting in A) the right words, and B) the right amount of words. Here’s why.

1) No keywords = no visibility.

LinkedIn is a search tool. Just like Google, if you want to find what you are looking for, you need to put in specific keywords to narrow down the search results. For example, if I’m looking for a marketing professional with social media experience, I would put in “marketing” and “social media.” The LinkedIn platform then searches through all the candidates with those skill sets and looks at how many times those keywords show up throughout their profile. This is known as “keyword density.” The more density you have for the search term, the higher up in the search results your profile goes. (This quick video explains it all.)

4) If you build it, they will come.

Spending time optimizing your LinkedIn profile is worth it. The more active you are on LinkedIn, the better your results will be. Remember, the number of LinkedIn users is only going to grow, creating more competition in search results. The longer you put off optimizing your profile, the lower you’ll show on the list–if you show up at all.

See all 4 fixes and the complete Inc. article

6 of the Most Powerful LinkedIn Stats for Sales Professionals

As a social seller, you know you can turn that data into action. With over 414 million members, LinkedIn enjoys access to fantastic data on professionals all over the world.

We’ve collected some of our latest and greatest stats on how B2B buyers and sellers are faring. Take a look at what we’ve learned about what is (and isn’t) working for B2B selling today.

1. Look Your Best

The Stat: The best photo for your LinkedIn profile is one that looks like a professional headshot. This means no blurry images or other people in the photo. In fact, profiles with photos receive a 40% higher InMail response rate.

Take Action: Use this and similar statistics to inspire your leadership to splurge for professional headshots (if they haven’t already). If that’s not possible, ask a friend!

4. Lead with Ideas

The Stat: 92% of B2B buyers engage with sales professionals who are known as industry thought-leaders.

Take Action: Build your reputation and your influence by joining groups, sharing content, answering questions, and making insightful contributions that go beyond self-promotion and cheesy sales tactics.

See all 6 and the complete article

11 Sloppy LinkedIn Mistakes That You’re Too Qualified to Make

By Young Entrepreneur Council

A LinkedIn profile’s an awesome opportunity to shine beyond the traditional resume. Between your job history, publications, endorsements, and connections, potential employers scan your information to see what you can bring to the team that no one else can. But if your profile is riddled with typos or you don’t have an adequate picture, an employer isn’t going to see you as a viable candidate.

We asked 11 entrepreneurs and members of YEC to share the mistakes they see most often and how they hurt your professional image in an employer’s eyes. Here’s what you should avoid:

2. Being Inconsistent

When we review resumes and the LinkedIn profiles of candidates, there are inconsistencies in employment dates and job titles 50% of the time. Candidates also don’t update their profiles often enough. If you are applying for a position, make sure that yours is free of inconsistencies and stays in line with your resume.

Duran Inci, Optimum7

5. Making Vague Claims of Expertise

When I’m vetting potential hires, I look at LinkedIn to get an idea of their expertise and work history. All too often, I see vague bombastic claims of technical expertise that aren’t backed up by any evidence. If you claim to have web design expertise, link to sites that demonstrate it. If you claim to be a brilliant developer, link to GitHub repos that show your work.

Vik Patel, Future Hosting

See all 11 and the complete The Muse article

Are You Making These 8 Embarrassing Mistakes on LinkedIn?

by Alison Green

LinkedIn can be an incredibly powerful tool for networking, expanding your contacts and even finding jobs, but it has its own unique etiquette land mines. Here are eight of the most common faux pas people make on LinkedIn – and how to make sure that you avoid them.

1. Sending generic connection requests. It was probably a mistake for LinkedIn to provide default text for the connection request emails sent through its system because many people don’t bother to customize it. People who know you well might not mind receiving the default message, but if you’re trying to connect with someone who may not even remember you, it’s smarter to personalize the message and remind the person of how you know each other and why you’re asking to connect. Plus, even if the person does remember you, you’ll make a better impression and solidify the connection by writing something personalized.

6. Filling your summary with subjective self-assessments. Calling yourself a “visionary leader,” “charismatic communicator,” “exceptional marketer” or other highly subjective self-assessments is likely to elicit eye rolls. If those things are true about you, it should be evidence from the accomplishments you list. Let others who know your work effusively praise you. It’s not something that you credibly do yourself.

8. Inflating your experience. It’s bad enough to inflate your experience, skills and accomplishments on your resume. But when you do it on LinkedIn, people who know the truth will see it. If your co-workers or former co-workers look at your profile and see you reporting accomplishments or responsibilities that they know you didn’t have much of a hand in, they will know that you’re lying. It will destroy your credibility, possibly get you gossiped about and make people less likely to vouch for you in the future. Keep it truthful.

See all 8 mistakes and the complete USNews article

How to Publish on LinkedIn Pulse: A Beginner’s Guide

Written by Carly Stec | @

Try as I may, I’ll never be able to recreate my mother’s tomato sauce recipe. It’s a science; a tried-and-tested formula that took her years to master. (Time well spent, if you ask me.)

But the great thing about formulas is that they provide us with a starting point — a list of the elements we need to produce an intended outcome. From there, it’s up to us to put them together.

When LinkedIn announced that they’d be opening up their publishing platform, Pulse, to the public in February 2014, the professional network suddenly turned into a more interesting destination for marketers to explore.

What does my mom’s tomato sauce have to do with this?

Well, while many were quick to see results from the new platform, others felt hesitant about whether or not they should give it a go. And without a clear formula for how to approach the unfamiliar territory, many continue to remain sidelined today.

Unwilling to leave good marketers behind, we’ve put together a roundup of everything you need to know before you hit publish on LinkedIn Pulse. From topics, to structure, to timing, this post will have you up to speed in no time.

How to Post on LinkedIn Pulse

1) Explore the platform first.

Before you dive into a post, it’s important to note that LinkedIn’s publishing platform is a little different than your company blog. The audience, the tone, and the overall lay of the land are unique to LinkedIn.

What does the lay of the land look like, then? In a SlideShare announcing the publishing platform’s launch, LinkedIn described themselves as “the working world in one place.” They wrote, “LinkedIn has millions of executives, entrepreneurs, entry-level, workers, and people about to retire.” While this sounds like a valuable audience to tap into, you’ll want to be sure that it aligns with your company’s buyer persona — otherwise, it’s not worth publishing there.

Once you figure out if you should be publishing on LinkedIn, it’s time to learn how to post on LinkedIn Pulse successfully. Here are a few, according to LinkedIn:

  • Write about areas in which you have an expertise.
  • Keep your writing focused. Avoid covering too many topics in the same post.
  • Keep your voice authentic.
  • Don’t shy away from expressing your opinion. However, keep your long-form posts appropriate for the LinkedIn audience. Don’t post anything obscene, shocking, hateful, intimidating, or otherwise unprofessional.
  • Publish whenever you have something valuable to share with LinkedIn members. In general, the more long-form posts you publish, the more credibility you will build, and the stronger your professional profile will become.
  • There are no limits on word count, but the long-form posts that are best received are more than three paragraphs.
  • Upload pictures, videos, presentations, and documents to add to your content. It helps bring your insights to life and is a good way to showcase concrete examples of your experience.
  • Use the share box on your homepage to share short-form thoughts, questions, and other media such as articles and images. (Learn more about sharing on LinkedIn here.)
  • Have colleagues, friends, or family members review and edit your long-form posts.

Want to learn more great tips for publishing on LinkedIn? Check out this post by LinkedIn Executive Editor Daniel Roth on how to crush it as a LinkedIn writer.

2) Hone in on a specific topic.

See the rest of #2 and the complete HubSpot article