LinkedIn Adds New Hub For Meeting In Person

By
 
LinkedIn took professional networking online. Now it wants to help people network in person again.

The Microsoft-owned social media network for professionals announced Tuesday that it's adding a new feature called Events that lets users organize in-person meetings. The new feature, which goes live in English speaking countries on Thursday, allows users to send out invites and provides attendees a place to discuss event details. 

Hosts can use filters search to search their networks for people they want to invite, including by location, company, industry, and school. Users can also make their events searchable so that others can join the events as well. 

Read the full Fortune article
 

5 People You Should Ask For LinkedIn Recommendations

Jessica Holbrook Hernandez

LinkedIn recommendations are a tremendous asset to your job search. You can quickly and easily point a potential employer to your LinkedIn profile and they’ll be able to see verifiable references and recommendations of the quality of your work and the results you deliver. Positive words can be powerful motivators.


So, how do you choose the right people to request a recommendation from? And how do you know if they’ll give you a good recommendation?



2. The Team Player

When you work in a team on a specific project and the collaboration is a success, that’s the time to ask your teammates to write a recommendation for you based on the outcome and collaboration of that specific project. You can also return the favor; since you worked together you’ll be able to easily attest to their work ethic, problem solving, communication, teamwork, fresh ideas, motivation—the list goes on…



5. The Board Or Volunteer Head

Are you an active member of a nonprofit or involved in volunteering for a great cause? Ask someone who oversees the organization to recommend you for the work you’ve been doing. Not only is this more positive PR for your profile, but it shows your interests and desire to help others.


Have some additional ideas for great LinkedIn recommendation requests? Share them here; I’d love to hear them! And while LinkedIn is on your mind I’d love to connect so feel free to send me an invitation here.


See all 5 people and the complete Careerealism article

17 Ways To Post On LinkedIn To Get Noticed



Andrew is a Baby Boomer and Director at a Fortune 500 company that I was working with last week to write his LinkedIn profile when I asked him why he didn’t post on LinkedIn. He was trying to get more attention for himself while looking for a specific kind of job. He has never posted before and needed some guidance on exactly what to put out there. I turned to Hannah Morgan, a guru of job search information.

Before becoming a job search strategist and facilitator, Morgan of Rochester New York spent time working in HR recruiting where a lot of hiring was going on. She also worked for Lee Hecht Harrison doing outplacement classes and I asked for her advice.

I asked why people don’t post and she noted three reasons:

#1 they don’t know what to post

#2 they worry it’s self-promotion

#3 they don’t realize it is important to post and share with their network

The easiest thing to do is post about your job, occupation, your company, your industry and share that with your network. If you found it on LinkedIn, then just re-share it. A good place to find articles is Twitter. Also, consider the following business newsfeeds and be the first to post big business news. You need to be fast on these within the first couple hours of when the story breaks. Mergers, Acquisitions, major new product releases. I recommend you follow the NY Times and Bloomberg. You must add a comment before you post. Pick out a key point or simply ask a question.

Why take the time to post

When you share it shows up in the news feed of all the people that you’re connected to. This keeps you up-to-date with your group and the shares can engage others and get you on the radar of people in front of your network. It might also attract the attention of a recruiter or HR person.

One misstep to avoid is do not share anything negative on social media. Always say something positive, for example, maybe your company is doing a layoff don’t post “oh my old company downsizing again.” Remember words live forever on social media so be overly cautious about what you put out there, Morgan recommends.

People using LinkedIn expect to see posts in their feed that are professional (work-related), helpful, educational, useful, and/or informative.

What to Post
Are you looking for ideas for what to post on LinkedIn? Morgan offered 16 different types of status updates you can adapt and use.

1. Ask a question. Start a conversation about something in your field or industry or ask for advice. You want to get comments to your questions as this keeps the post live in other people’s feed. 

2. Use hashtags. If you want to make sure that people notice the content of what you’re posting, just use hashtags. You can use up to three. so if you are writing about the company say for example your writing about T-Mobile you would do #TMobile or if you’re writing about your industry you would do #finance as this allows your information to get more attention and possibly a recruiter might be looking for it.

3. Share a Video. You may not feel comfortable on camera, but you can share a video that educates or inspires.

See all 17 ways and the complete Forbes article

Eight Content Creation Mistakes That Ruin Your Personal Brand On LinkedIn


8 Ways to Better Market Yourself on LinkedIn

Brian Honigman

LinkedIn has always been the industry standard when it comes to marketing yourself professionally, but the past few years have seen the social network’s importance and reach increase 
dramatically. TechCrunch reports that LinkedIn has roughly 187 million unique visitors per month, and that number looks like it’ll continue to grow.

In addition, LinkedIn has ramped up its efforts to become a content platform. In the past three years LinkedIn has acquired SlidesharePulse and Newsle; all of which hint at a continuing push towards content distribution.

Instead of just maintaining your profile and company page and being active in LinkedIn groups, LinkedIn is now encouraging brands and individuals to leverage its robust, new publishing capabilities. It is clear that LinkedIn sees itself as a vital part of the future of content marketing.

Building out your LinkedIn presence can seem intimidating. There are so many options now that the thought of exploiting them all can overwhelm even the savviest marketers.

Keeping this problem in mind, I set out to track down the most influential and accomplished LinkedIn experts and ask them to weigh in on their recommendations for making the most of your LinkedIn Marketing.

Viveka von Rosen: Leverage LinkedIn’s CRM

Viveka von Rosen is a prominent LinkedIn expert and author of the book LinkedIn Marketing: An Hour a Day. Her recommendation not only highlights some interesting, often overlooked LinkedIn features, but also shows how they can be used to strengthen your networking connections.

Viveka notes that “LinkedIn is about building relationships, and one of the best ways of building relationships is to show your top prospects that you were listening to them.” With this in mind, she points out that LinkedIn actually provides users with fairly robust CRM tools.

She recommends leveraging these tools in five steps:
1. Research your prospect or client (or better yet, have a conversation with them – maybe at a conference or trade show?)
2. Make your notes about the person on their LinkedIn profile. (Click on the star icon to “unfold” LinkedIn’s CRM feature.)
3. Set a reminder to follow up with your prospect.
4. Find an article of your own or search Pulse to find content you think they might be interested in.
5. You can also tag your prospects, segmenting your network in a way that makes sense to you, and that will allow you to follow up with them in smaller groups.


Stephanie Sammons: The “10 in 10″ Rule

Stephanie Sammons is a renowned LinkedIn expert, named a Top 30 Marketing Thought Leader and a Top 25 Social Media Expert by LinkedIn, who coaches professionals on how to maximize their social presence. Her recommendation for marketers and business owners who hope to build their presence is to adopt what she refers to as the “10 in 10” rule.
“While others are pumping out content and status updates to their entire network” Stephanie instead encourages professionals to “go one-to-one with 10 of your connections 10 minutes a day.”

If you spend 10 minutes a day engaging personally with 10 of your valued LinkedIn contacts, you will grow your influence.

The first step in her process is to identify your MVC’s (Most Valuable Connections) LinkedIn. “These may be prospects, clients, influencers, or advocates for your business. Next, study their profiles and learn more about who they are, what they do, and who they help.”

She continues by noting that “once you are armed with greater intelligence about your MVC’s, strive for a one-to-one engagement with at least 10 of these individuals per day. One-to-one engagement can be in the form of a personalized, private LinkedIn message, a public comment or conversation, a or even an @mention.”

The reasoning goes that a personal, intimate connection with a smaller number of followers can be much more beneficial than an attempt to please everyone. This appears straightforward, but it seems that so few actually spend the emotional energy necessary to foster these connections.

Stephanie offers the assurance that although this consistent connection is hard to maintain, it will be well worth it in the long-run and ultimately lead to social media success.

See all 8 ways and the complete Entrepreneur article

3 Ways to Use LinkedIn to Build Your Career

Heather R. Huhman

In a world where social media allows us to connect with almost everyone in the free world instantaneously, one platform dominates the professional networking space. Its name? LinkedIn.

By now, most people in the professional world have heard of LinkedIn. Job seekers know it can help them find a career, but many don’t know how to maximize their use of the platform. This hurts their chances of standing out to the almost 50 percent of companies that solely use it in their social recruiting practices.

When employers look for potential candidates on LinkedIn, there are a multitude of ways they narrow down the pool. Check out these three tips to help you get the most out of your LinkedIn profile, increase your chances of getting noticed by recruiters, and become a better proactive job seeker. 

Apply for jobs

LinkedIn not only connects people in order to build their network, but also it allows you to find and apply for jobs directly through the site! Just like any other job board, you can search for the exact job you want and discover employers from around the world. The benefit for job searching through LinkedIn: it allows employers and job seekers near-instant access to connect and gather information about each other, and gives candidates more insight into the company and its employees.

If you make a list of companies you want to work for (which you should, if you haven’t), LinkedIn lets you follow the company pages of those that have one. On those pages, companies often exclusively post jobs, since they know it will reach people who have already vested interest in their organization by following them in the first place. This gives you access to positions you never would have known existed and also lets you engage/connect with employees in those organizations.

When you apply for a job on LinkedIn, it’s important to read the entire job posting. Doing so lets you get a feel for what exactly they’re seeking so you can tailor your application specifically to the posting.

Since the LinkedIn application system only lets you attach a resume when applying, many companies give specific instructions for how they want candidates to apply in order to get more information. By not doing so, you’re probably not going to get considered for the job, since they now know you just blindly applied without following the application instructions.

Also, don’t just apply to every job posting because it’s so easy — chances are, it won’t get noticed.


10 LinkedIn mistakes that will cost you a job

By J. Barbush

Remember when networking was something you did with your dad or mom and their circle? Your parents would mention to their friends, "Did you know my daughter is interested in advertising?"

Nowadays you don't need a parental circle, or even your parents, to connect to people who can help with your career.

You do need a plan. Now that you can contact people so easily on LinkedIn, how will you use that access?

LinkedIn adds texture to a boring résumé. It brings your interests, charities, and portfolio to life in one place.

But it's also easy to overindulge—like a college freshman at his or her first kegger—and embarrass yourself. Making a silly mistake on Facebook is one thing. Embarrassing yourself on LinkedIn could cost you a job or career.

Here are some common mistakes to avoid on LinkedIn:

Mistake No. 1: You don't consider yourself a product.
Deconstruct what you like about your favorite brands. Are they funny, clever, consistent? Do they always deliver on their identities? Do they innovate? Do they have a competitive advantage? Keeping those considerations in mind will help you build a simple, tailored, smart profile.


Once you determine your personal product voice, incorporate it into your profile. Lead with a concise, well-written summary that details your capabilities and what you can contribute.

Mistake No. 3: You're too social.
Stop thinking of LinkedIn as a social network. It's a professional network. There's a big difference in how you approach a social dinner versus a business dinner, right?

Use this analogy. Rather than focus on connecting with buddies, zero in on connecting with people you just met at a conference. You may not be as "social" with them as with your college buddies, but you do have a common business interest that will serve you much better on this platform.

Your headshot should also be professional. A suggestive shot or one that shows you partying won't go over well in human resources. 

See all 10 mistakes and the complete article