Thursday, September 11, 2014

Creative Ways to Use LinkedIn in Your Job Search

Part one:  Look into Career Paths, Research People and Follow Companies

Are you guilty of logging in to LinkedIn to just look at people’s profile pictures, check out the latest updates and browse? Not to worry, you are not alone. In my experience in career consulting many people tell me they have LinkedIn accounts but have no idea what to do on the site.  People tend to grossly underestimate the value of actively engaging on LinkedIn. Most use LinkedIn to search for jobs and network with others. I advise all my clients, if they are in the job market, to log on to LinkedIn several times a week, if not daily. With millions of users LinkedIn is an awesome place to gain information about career paths, skill sets and industry news!

How to discover career paths:
To learn about career paths on LinkedIn
  • Search your connections for people who are doing what you aspire to do and review their profiles.
  • Read their profile in reverse to determine what they did prior to their current job. This will help you see how they attained their current position.
  • Make note of what qualifications they have, the keywords used in their profile and what types of activities they’ve been involved with.
While everyone’s career path will be different, use this approach to gather ideas for new ways to find the job you seek.

If you do not have any connections with people who hold positions which you aspire to, search for new connections in relevant industry specific groups. LinkedIn has a fantastic “groups feature” which provides a place for industry professionals or people with similar interests to discuss business, share content, ask/ answer each other’s questions and sometimes post jobs. If you join the right groups, you could learn about industry trends, and have current information about the industry for which you are interviewing. This will aid you in arriving to your interview prepared to discuss the work and ask good questions.

Research People and Follow Companies:
Another best practice for using LinkedIn while job searching is to follow companies which you plan to (or desire to) interview with to research the company. This is a strategy I have personally employed, here’s why:
  • Companies will often share different information on their LinkedIn Company page than what is presented on their website.
  • You can also see their current and former employees and read company status updates.
  • Prior to the interview, find out whom you’re interviewing with
    • review their profile on LinkedIn
Most people go to interviews with no information about who they will be meeting; while the prospective employer has read your resume and likely Googled you. With the access that LinkedIn provides, this should no longer be the case. Go into the interview armed with a little knowledge about what led your interviewer to their current position.  You may even have a few shared connections!  Use the information you find about your interviewer to “break the ice”.  Should you make it to the second or third round of interviews this will prove to be helpful as you will be introduced to more people at-varied levels within the company. If possible, make a habit of finding out who you will be speaking with and get to know each person that will interview you.

LinkedIn is an invaluable tool that could be used to give you leverage as you job search, network or consider learning a new skill or career.  When using the site, think of it as a free career counselor with endless information, right at your fingertips!


Part Two: Learn Skills and Read the News  - Read about Part Two and the complete Simply Hired article

Thursday, September 4, 2014

The World's Best Tips for Rocking Your LinkedIn Job Search

By Scott Dockweiler

We've said it before and we'll say it again—a LinkedIn profile is up there with a resume and cover letter in job search must-haves for our day and age.

But while making a profile is a great first step, it won't do you much good in your job search unless you know how to leverage it. So this week, we've scoured the web for some of the best advice on maximizing LinkedIn's potential to land you a job.



  • To start, read up on these 12 helpful ideas for getting more out of LinkedIn(12 Most)


  • Understand the tactics recruiters use on LinkedIn in order to plan out your strategy. (U.S. News)


  • Learn which type of profile photo works best to attract recruiters(LinkedIn Talent Blog)

  • 5 more tips / resources and the complete TheMuse article
  • Thursday, August 28, 2014

    5-Step Quick Guide For Getting Started On LinkedIn



    If you’ve never been on LinkedIn before, it can be a little overwhelming. That’s why we created a 5-Step Quick Guide for getting started on LinkedIn – Take a look:

    Step 1: Update Your Resume

    The first step is to make sure your actual resume is updated. Once you’ve done that, then you can transfer the data to your LinkedIn Profile.

    Need help updating your resume? Here are a few articles that can help:
    If you need further help with your resume, consider looking into a professional resume writer.

    Step 2: Change Your Privacy Settings

    Your resume is done – great! Now, it’s time to start adding information to your LinkedIn Profile. Before you add anything, make sure you change your Privacy Settings so your profile activity isn’t visible until you’re done filling out your profile. You don’t want your connections seeing every single change you make to your profile!

    Need help with this? Visit LinkedIn Help for more information.

    See all 5 steps and the complete Careerealism article

    Wednesday, August 13, 2014

    The 5 Latest LinkedIn Features You Should Start Using Today

    William Arruda

    The folks at LinkedIn are busy. They are rolling out refinements and new features at an unprecedented rate. Staying on top of these opportunities is the key to staying on top of your online personal branding. If you want your profile to stand out, start using my five favorite LinkedIn upgrades.

    3. Profile Rank. LinkedIn now shows you how you rank among your connections based on the total number of profile views. It shows you rank among “professionals like you,” people in your company” and “your 1st-level connections.” This can help you understand who in your network is generating the most interest, and it will give you a feel for how you measure up against your network connections who are your peers or competitors. It also gives you an excuse to reach out to those in your network by congratulating them on their rank. If you are looking to make LinkedIn an important part of your personal branding communications plan (and you should!), you can use this to measure the impact of your status updates, long-form blog posts (see number 5 below) and posts/comments to groups. One easy way to increase profile views is to add a LinkedIn button to your email signature. Here’s how.

    5. LinkedIn Publishing Platform. The opportunity to publish your content on LinkedIn is rolling out to all members. You no longer need to be an official LinkedIn Influencer to make your content visible. Once you have been granted access to this feature, you’ll be able to create and post long-form content (in addition to your brief status updates). All you need to do is click the edit icon in the “share an update” box on your homepage. When you mouse over it, you will see “create a post,” and LinkedIn will guide you from there. Your posts will appear in your profile. High-quality, relevant posts are organically distributed through feedback such as views, likes, comments, and shares. Your post may even make it into LinkedIn Pulse, which uses an algorithm that matches the right content with the right professional. You can view stats related to all of your posts to determine their relative popularity.

    See all 5 features and the complete Forbes article

    Tuesday, August 12, 2014

    How to Stalk / Research Silently on LinkedIn

    by

    When we view a LinkedIn Profile we leave a digital footprint behind, but did you know you have some control over the visibility of that footprint?

    Before you make any changes, the default setting on a Profile is public and transparent. This setting means you leave a mark when looking at a Profile, this shows up in the “Who’s Viewed Your Profile” section.

    There are arguments for an against being transparent, and in most cases I do believe in showing that you are looking, but there are reasons to go into what one of my clients called ‘Stalker Mode’.  So if you were preparing for a meeting with a prospective client, looking at his Profile openly, shows you have done your research and are interested in knowing more.  On the other hand if you were sussing out a competitor, you may not want them to know.

    Go to your account settings (via  your icon at the top right of the LinkedIn window) and select ‘Privacy and Settings’, then ‘Select what others see when you’ve viewed their profile’.
    LI Privacy Settings How to Stalk / Research Silently on LinkedIn

    There are three modes to choose from; -  See the three modes and read the rest of the article

    Monday, August 11, 2014

    21 Steps To The Perfect LinkedIn Profile

    by

    The key to your success on LinkedIn begins with a powerful and professional presence.  You must strategically write your profile with your ideal client in mind before you start connecting to maximize the impact of your first impression online.

    I’ve outlined 21 different key points that I believe are important to fully optimizing your LinkedIn profile. Follow these 21 steps and you will have much greater success with LinkedIn!
    Go to this link to see the profile used in the examples below.


    LinkedIn Training: How To Create A LinkedIn Profile In 21 Steps


    3. Your Headline Should Be Catchy & Have Keywords You Want To Be Found For – Create a headline that captures your target market’s attention to encourage them to check out your profile.


    4. Connect With At Least 501 People – The reason I suggest this is because LinkedIn will show how many connections you have until you hit 500. People like to connect with “connected” people.

    10. Write In First Person – Your LinkedIn profile is not your resume so make sure you are always writing in first person.

    16. Keyword Load Your Current & Past Work History – Notice how in my profile I used keywords like “Social media speaker” and “social media trainer”.  These are some of the keywords I want to be found for.

    See all 21 steps and the complete article




    Thursday, August 7, 2014

    25 Resources To Help You Get Your LinkedIn Game On

    From Cincy Recruiter

    I'm an avid and daily user of LinkedIn and I'm always seeking to learn more about how to use it effectively for building relationships, networking, job search, recruiting, personal branding and business development. I also enjoy sharing what I've learned with others and regularly speak to groups, associations and corporate clients about how to use LinkedIn. At those events, I typically provide attendees a LinkedIn Resource sheet to take home. I'm in the process of updating my Resources sheet for 2009, and I thought I'd share the links that were provided over the past year with you. So here you go:

    Why You Should Use LinkedIn:
    Read All The Reasons You Should Be Using Linkedin And How -
    http://www.cincyrecruiter.com/cincy_recruiter/2009/01/25-resources-to-help-you-understand-how-to-use-linkedin.html