Monday, September 21, 2020

How to Make Your LinkedIn Headline Way More Effective in Under 5 Minutes

Wednesday, September 16, 2020

6 Recruiter Recommended LinkedIn Tips

 By Kyra Mancine

Many recruiters and staffing managers rely on LinkedIn extensively when sourcing candidates. Whether you're employed or looking for a job, keeping your profile up-to-date is important. Maximize your profile, target your activity and you WILL get noticed.

1) Make the most of stealth mode. If you're updating your profile and DON'T want people to see every change you make, go into settings and click on "Turn on/off your activity broadcasts." This is highly recommended if you're employed and looking for new opportunities. It can look suspicious to your current employer and colleagues if they start to see you making additions to your page.

3) Quantify your accomplishments. Hiring managers look through dozens, and in many cases, hundreds, of profiles daily. You really only have seconds to grab their attention. Add statistics, numbers and percentages that show how you saved your employers time, effort and money.

5) Make your status updates count.  Don't be "me" focused. Even though your LinkedIn page is obviously about you, it's better to offer your connections information that's relevant to THEM. You don't have to create the content yourself. Search Google and Yahoo for industry articles, career related content, etc. Don't be controversial. Safe topics can include workplace satisfaction, how to be more productive during the day, interview advice, etc. Remember, any time one of your connections comments and likes your status update, all their connections see it as well.

See all 6 tips and the complete article

Monday, September 14, 2020

LinkedIn offers top 20 professional courses for free through the end of September

 By Kayla Webster

 

It’s back-to-school time for employees too — LinkedIn Learning is offering their 20 most popular online courses of the year for free throughout the month of September.

LinkedIn executives say they’re offering the courses free of charge to help as many employees as possible cope with the pandemic — especially workers from underrepresented communities and those affected by layoffs. LinkedIn Learning saw a 130% uptick in course participation once shelter-in-place orders were issued in March.

“With a lot of people out of work or working remotely at this time, we are seeing a lot of employees investing in themselves and their careers,” says Mordy Golding, director of content strategy for English-language at LinkedIn Learning. “Our hard skill classes, like Excel, are still popular, but there are soft skills we all need in order to succeed in the new normal.”

LinkedIn’s most popular course teaches people strategies for helping them work from home more efficiently. The shift to remote work has been a challenge for employees, who have struggled with increased stress and burnout, says Dave Crenshaw, a productive leadership author and LinkedIn Learning instructor.

“We have a lot of freedom when we’re working from home,” says Crenshaw, who has worked remotely for the past 20 years. “[Employers’] biggest concern is that the people working from home are going to slack off. But the bigger problem is that people never stop working, and that hurts productivity in the long run — performance degrades and work-life balance erodes.”

While employees and managers may be tempted to stick to hard skill courses, Golding recommends participating in classes that focus on soft skills like “being a good listener” because it “transfers well to the remote workforce,” he says. He also suggests that employers take advantage of LinkedIn Learning’s group feature to allow teams to take the courses collectively.

“A very large percentage of people who watch the courses can immediately apply the skills they’ll learn to their job,” Golding says. “If you’re thinking about the long-term health of your organization, it’s a good idea to leverage learning to have an immediate impact on productivity, and bring people together.”

1) Time Management: Working from Home
Instructor: Dave Crenshaw

Help your employees learn how to set up a dedicated workspace for maximum productivity, collaborate with their colleagues, craft their daily schedule and master the art of virtual meetings. This course also offers advice for working parents, and other caregivers, about how to more effectively balance professional and personal responsibilities at home.

5) Developing Your Emotional Intelligence
Instructor: Gemma Leigh Roberts

Roberts explains what emotional intelligence is and why it's important in today’s workforce. She can help learners become more self-aware so they can acclimate to the dynamic new world of work. 
 
10) Project Management Foundations
 
Instructor: Bonnie Biafore

In this course, Biafore explains the fundamentals of project management — from establishing project goals and objectives to managing resources, meeting deadlines and bringing projects to completion. 
12) Learning Personal Branding
Instructor: Chelsea Krost

Honing your employees’ personal branding helps their ideas get noticed to sell to internal stakeholders, partners and customers. Krost explains how to develop a personal story and build a personal brand presence online and off.

See all 20 courses and the complete BenefitNews article

Wednesday, September 9, 2020

4 Big Changes To Your LinkedIn Profile You Need To Know About

William Arruda

Your LinkedIn profile is one of the most powerful career assets you have. It’s your professional portfolio—a multimedia representation of who you are and the value you deliver. And in our new all-the-time, all-virtual world thanks to Covid-19, your LinkedIn profile has become your first impression. What’s more, your LinkedIn About section (formerly called your Summary) will be the most read version of your bio.  
In today’s uncertain times, it’s more important than ever to stay on top of your LinkedIn profile and to refine it regularly so it’s always relevant and compelling to the people you want to reach. You also need to stay on top of the myriad refinements and new features LinkedIn adds to the platform so you can instantly benefit from them and ensure your personal brand stands out and clearly differentiates you from the hundreds of millions of other LinkedIn members.
LinkedIn’s latest blog post references many of the most recent changes. The ones I highlight here will be most valuable to you as you build your brand and make a positive, authentic first impression online. 
1) Let people know you’re open to new adventures.
With the new OpenToWork photo frame on your headshot, you can alert those who are checking you out that you’re ready for your next big gig. I’m thrilled that LinkedIn added this. Before this feature came along, many who were seeking work used their headline to tell others of their availability with a statement like “Ready for my next adventure” or “Seeking New Opportunities.” This created two challenges. First, it sounded a little desperate, and second, it reduced the number of characters available in your headline to tell people who you are, what you do and the value you create when you do it. This new format is a little more subtle and creates consistency across the platform for those who are in job-seeking mode. The words in your headline are important in the LinkedIn search algorithm, so you want to use exactly the right keywords to reel in those who are looking for what you have to offer. Luckily, you no longer have to waste those words by telling people you’re looking for work.
3) Shine a spotlight on your best work.
LinkedIn has allowed you to add multimedia to your profile for years now, but they enhanced this feature recently. Before, you could add multimedia to the bottom of your About (and to the Experience section of your profile). Now, they’ve created a whole new section called Featured, where you can put your most relevant and up-to-date images, videos, PDFs, etc. to augment and reinforce what you say about yourself in your About. And it has been given some really important real estate, appearing in a large panel right below your About. Being a completely new element of your profile, the Featured section serves as a dynamic billboard of items you can showcase to demonstrate your brilliance. Update it regularly so it remains current and relevant.

Wednesday, September 2, 2020

11 Emerging LinkedIn Trends And How To Prepare For Them

While LinkedIn dominates as the most popular social media site for both job seekers and companies to find networking opportunities and build professional connections, new trends constantly emerge, and the role of the platform is always evolving. To make the most of their LinkedIn presence, users on both sides of the recruiting equation need to stay aware of these trends and know how to leverage them.

For job seekers, tapping into these trends can get you noticed before the rest of the crowd—and in a saturated market, that could mean the difference between landing a job or losing out to other candidates. For recruiters, staying up on trends will help maximize the number of qualified candidates you have access to, which affords a breadth of options.

To find out how job seekers and recruiters can prepare to make the most of them, we asked 11 members of Forbes Coaches Council for their predictions around up-and-coming LinkedIn trends. Here's what they told us.

1. Moving Toward Online Training And Certification
LinkedIn is making its move toward distance education and online training, offering fresh courses such as digital marketing and social media management. Plus, it gives the opportunity to update your new achievement in your profile and connect with people with the same qualifications. Its variety is extensible, and soon enough, LinkedIn will compete with colossal certification organizations. - Jill Douka MBA, MCC, Global Academy Of Coaching

7. Becoming A Unique Source Of Candidates
My crystal ball says that, within five years, companies won't seek applications online; they will just source directly from LinkedIn. They will find the candidates based on algorithmic searching and AI and decide which ones they want to talk to. Candidates should prepare now in two ways: First, make sure your profile has relevant words, and then, learn networking for job search to reach the hiring team. - Dana Manciagli, Job Search Master Class

8. Expediting Social And Professional Proofing
Social and professional proofing will begin to carry greater weight as professionals want to know "who is endorsing this individual." With this, LinkedIn recommendations will begin to become more of a focal point. Recruiters and job seekers can prepare by tailoring their current functions to incorporate (review, consider, rank, track, etc.) recommendations. - Corey Castillo, Truth & Spears

See all 11 trends and the complete Forbes article