Friday, January 18, 2013

7 Tips For Writing A Great LinkedIn Invitation

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Whether you’re new to LinkedIn or you’re a seasoned user, connecting with new people can be a challenge, especially when you’re not sure what to write in your LinkedIn invitation.

You might be tempted to use the generic “I’d like to add you to my professional network on LinkedIn” template, but beware! By not personalizing your message, you could lose a precious opportunity to network.

How To Write A LinkedIn Invitation

Here are seven great tips on writing LinkedIn invitations from our approved career experts:

1. Be Honest

“Explain why you want to connect with the person,” says Amanda Haddaway, author of Destination Real World: Success After Graduation For New And Soon-To-Be College Graduates. ”Just say something. There’s nothing worse than receiving a LinkedIn request with the standard, generic format and not having any earthly idea who the person is or why he/she wants to connect with you.”
Dorothy Tannahill-Moran of Next Chapter New Life says honesty is the best policy when trying to connect with someone, especially if you’re looking to do some serious networking.

“If you want to work for their company,” Tannahill-Moran says, “don’t be shy about admitting that they are working for your targeted company and are looking for insights about that company. Open communication is always best.”

2. Tell Them How You Know Them

“I get a lot of requests and I always appreciate a brief mention of why the person wants to connect,” says Jenny Yerrick Martin of Your Industry Insider. ”Whether they saw my post on a LinkedIn group, found me through my website, or know someone who knows me in real life, that extra step usually gets me to accept the invitation.”

3. Find Something In Common

When trying to to find something in common with your potential connection, Haddaway suggests asking yourself these questions:
  • Is it a mutual career field or interest?
  • Do you have connections in common?
  • Are you connected through LinkedIn Groups?
Here’s a request example offered by Debra Wheatman of Careers Done Write:
Example: Dear Jane: I see that you are a member of xxx group. I am also engaged with this group and would like to share some ideas with you. Please accept my invitation to connect.
This example is short and sweet, but it gets the point across effectively.

4. Make It Personal


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